Trilobite of the Week: BUMASTIS ioxus

Trilobite of the Week: BUMASTIS ioxus

By Joseph “PaleoJoe” Kchodl The BUMASTIS ioxus trilobite was found in the United States during the digging of the Erie Canal. It was first discovered in 1839 in a gorge dug for the canal. Being roughly oval in shape, it is difficult to judge which is the...
Trilobite of the Week: MODOCIA brevispina

Trilobite of the Week: MODOCIA brevispina

One of the more rare MODOCIA species, the name makes an apt description. Other MODOCIA have large genal spines, and this species does not. It has small spines; hence, the term brevispina. This trilobite is roughly oval in shape and has a semi-circular cephalon, or...
Trilobite of the Week: GREENOPS boothi

Trilobite of the Week: GREENOPS boothi

By Joseph “PaleoJoe” Kchodl GREENOPS boothi can be found in several parts of Michigan, New York, and Ontario, Canada. This Devonian trilobite is very showy with all the spikes and spines it has on its body. The long and broad genal spines help us to...
Trilobite of the Week: CYPHASPIS carrolli

Trilobite of the Week: CYPHASPIS carrolli

By Joseph “PaleoJoe” Kchodl CYPHASPIS carrolli is a rare and spectacular trilobite. Found in the Haragan Formation in Coal County, Oklahoma, it is a recent addition to the body of scientific knowledge about trilobites. Trilobite paleontologist Robert...
Trilobite of the Week: CEDARIA minor

Trilobite of the Week: CEDARIA minor

By Joseph “PaleoJoe” Kchodl This is a cute but small oval-shaped trilobite. Typically, CEDARIA minor measures 3/8 inches long. It has a smooth glabella and Cephalon with a medium profile, making it not too tall or inflated. The Cephalon ends in...
Trilobite of the Week: PERONOPSIS interstricta

Trilobite of the Week: PERONOPSIS interstricta

By Joseph “PaleoJoe” Kchodl The PERONOPSIS interstricta were small, blind trilobites that were isopygious, meaning the head section and the tail section were roughly the same size. In fact, at first glance, one cannot determine which end is the front and...